Becoming a digital nomad

My last post explained that I’m experimenting with working remotely from another country – Digital nomad technology. Well now I’ve arrived, got settled, and have already completed a few weeks of work. Here’s how it’s all going:

If there’s anything you would like to ask about my learning journey as a digital nomad please ask.

Digital nomad technology

On my learning plan for this year I’m experimenting with becoming a digital nomad and will be vlogging my experience. Here I am preparing and deciding what technology to take with me.

I’ll also be taking my Voip headset for international and Skype calls.

Wish me luck on my journey and I’ll share what happens on the other side in Vietnam.

Learning, design, and curated resources

Design Curated Studio Contemporary Creative

Content curation to me is not just one thing or one methodology. I see content curation as different techniques for using (and sometimes modifying) already existing resources rather than creating from new. From this perspective there are a lot of different ways curated resources can be used for learning. Here are some ways content curation techniques can be implemented into learning and learning design.

Pure resource curation

 

“The hunter gatherer of content curation”

 

What does this look like?

This is gathering existing resources/information/artefacts on a topic and putting it in one place to grab at your will. You’ve hunted (or used a tool to hunt) for the content and now its gathered in one place. Although you’ve filtered and selected the best content there is no rearrangement of it. It is simply made available in it’s raw form.

Here’s a personal example; at the moment I’m learning about interactive video and 360 video as a learning solution. To research this area I’m using a content curation tool http://www.anderspink.com. I have kept all my curated content in one area:

curated content 360.png

When content curation is mentioned it is this usually this method that is being referred to. Where information is hunted and gathered into one place and then utilised and/or shared.

Ideas of when you could use pure content curation:

  • Researching a specific topic
  • Watching trends in an industry
  • Gathering resources to support Special Interest Groups or learning communities

Don’t stop here though, this is only one method. There are more ways to use curated resources, such as, story based curation.

Story based resource curation

 

“Using existing resources and arranging them to create a different point of view”

 

What does this look like?

This is where resources are collected to make a new idea or story that is separate and different from the individual resources. They are arranged together to tell a story. The resources could be organised into a timeline or simply tell a story from comparing their similarities and differences. Good curation means you won’t need to overtly tell the story as the resources will do this for you.

“The whole is greater, than the sum of it’s parts” – Gesalt Psychology

Many museums are particularly good at this type of curation. Look for examples of this method at your local museum.

 Ideas of when you can use story based resource curation:

  • Showing changes over time
  • Using similarities or differences to tell a story

 Audience based resource curation

 

“Crowd sourcing and sharing curated resources based around a topic or task”

 

What does this look like?

The key difference here is who is finding and sharing the resources. Instead of resources being shared out from a central point like a Learning and Development department, they are instead being sourced by those who will use them and then shared into a central point. It is more active as it involves the audience in curating resources themselves.

An example of when I’ve used audience based curation are the research and share activities I designed in a university level course. Students were asked to search for relevant examples of the topic being studied and then share those onto Twitter with a set hashtag so others could view. Read more about this example here

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Ideas of when you can use audience based curation:

  • Great for micro search, find and share activities
  • When you want the audience to find examples of content that are relevant to their own experiences
  • Good for audiences with a wide range of different backgrounds or experience levels
  • Good for when the content or topic is rapidly changing and developing – a technique to keep the content current

These aren’t the only ways you can use curated resources for learning. How do you use content curation for learning? I’d love to hear your examples or thoughts.

 

Development and learning plan 2017

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As promised in my previous post Taking charge of your own learning I’ve drafted my development plan for the next 6 months or so.

This year I’m completing a career experiment so a lot of my development plan centres around this. I will be basing myself remotely for half the year in Vietnam. I figure I’m frequently designing and developing learning solutions for people who are working and learning remotely, so why not put myself in their shoes by experiencing working totally remotely too! That and I like a challenge and to be scared out of my comfort zone!

Some things that are important to me whilst working overseas are to maintain regular easy contact with my clients and social network, to avoid getting professionally isolated, and further develop my technical skills.

You will see from my development plan that a lot of my learning will be supported by research, curated content, social networks, reflecting and putting what I learn into practice. Most of it’s free and accessible, learning does not need to rely on a professional development budget or attending face-to-face courses. These are the sort of things you can do to develop without needing permission from your manager. I will be  working out loud as I develop these skills and work through my development plan.

This plan is a map for my intended development and there could be diversions as opportunities come up. I am open to your suggestions if you see anything that may be useful. Also if you have skills in the areas I’m looking to develop and are willing to share your experience please contact me.

Lorraine Minister’s Development Plan

Do you have a professional development plan? How do you take charge of your own learning?

Taking charge of your own learning

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Working as an independent contractor and freelancer I am responsible for my own professional development. I do not have a boss sitting me down and asking me how I would like to develop professionally and I do not have bi-annual performance meetings. No-one is pushing, or encouraging me to achieve or develop my career. It is my responsibility alone. I have complete freedom with no accountability.

This is a double edged sword. On one hand I can develop skills I am interested in, I can chose what, where, when and how I learn. And oh how I love that freedom! On the other hand I need to finance my own professional development and I have no accountability to anyone but myself. It could be easy to let the day to day work demands overtake learning and professional development, after all it’s nice to relax at night time right! But then future opportunities might start to dwindle and if I’m not learning and improving then I’m not maintaining my edge.

This year I have set myself a goal of doing bi-annual learning plans. In these I will plan what skills I will learn and practice, how I will do this, and when I will achieve it. Being self-employed I’ve decided I can be more accountable by sharing my plans with you! And you’re more than welcome to give me feedback too. If you think there’s something better I could do or something else you think I should check out.

I will publically post my learning plan next week to be accountable. I will share with you my successes and my failures in my professional development along the way. I’ll be open to conversations, feedback, and suggestions.

This is how I’m taking charge of my professional development this year. How will you take charge of yours?

Subscribe or follow me to see my plan in my next post.

Social Media to supercharge your professional development

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Social media is a fantastic way to super charge professional development. I’ve been on a 5 month extended work (and professional development) break. Two weeks before starting my first assignment I decided to super charge my learning through Social Media.

Switching on and tuning in

By spending at least 30 minutes a day on social media both consuming information and interacting with others on social media, I was able to dust off the cobwebs and switch my mind back into work mode. Being a new mum I have little time to read professional development books. I also work remotely from home and therefore don’t often see colleagues in the same learning and development space. Social media is the perfect solution for me as I can get overviews from thought leaders fast through their blogs and posts and I can also bounce ideas of others without the logistics of meeting in person. It helps me stay connected and relevant.

Keeping up to date

Social Media is essential for keeping up to date with the latest news, developments and trends in learning and development. For example, this week just happened to be international Working Out Loud week #WOLweek and there were heaps of gems being shared about this. This week Articulate also released their new version of Storyline 360 and very soon after the announcement tweets and blogs were out on social media sharing what the new tools can do.

Professional development plans

This year I plan to be more active on Social Media as I’ve found it so valuable to get back up to speed. It would be useful to refresh after Christmas break too. As part of my professional development I plan to spend time each day on social media (15-30 minutes) with both consuming information and also to interact and comment on at least one post/conversation per day. I also plan to get more active with blogging again with at least one post per month.

What are your plans with social media? Do you consider it necessary for your professional development? If you’re reading this post I’d love to hear from you and your thoughts.

A few gems

And here are some social media gems I found this week:

 

Monthly inspiration – Clive Sheppard

Clive Sheppard’s more than blended learning model

Clive Sheppards more than blended learning model

As part of Bloom’s International Learning Leaders webinar series I attended a webinar last month from Clive Sheppard about blended learning.

Here are some takeaways and reflections I got from this webinar:

Learning occurs over time and that’s why blended approaches are needed
In learning solutions build in plenty of opportunities for practice, feedback and reflection. Most learning solutions in organisations do not do this well and operate on delivering events (online or facilitated) rather than a complete learning journey.  Learning occurs over time and with practice.

Clive explained if no opportunities for practice and reinforcement are given then performance and confidence can even be damaged by one off training events. In the below slide, Clive shows how a typical corporate blend wouldn’t move staff beyond the conscious incompetence stage to improved performance:

Clive Sheppard unconscious incompetence


There is no specific formula for blends and they must include lots of practice
The blended solution will depend on the content and the environment. There is no one particular blend that is better than others. You can and should go beyond traditional blends such as an elearning course followed by a facilitated session. Remember to use simple solutions as part of your blends as well, such as, job aids, manager discussions, on the job assignments, peer sharing.

I’ve built myself a job aid that has a multitude of learning solutions that could be used during different phases of learning. This reminds me of how many different options there are to practice and reinforce learning. Why not build yourself something similar so you can see the huge variety in blends open to you and you could add to it from time to time with new solutions you’ve utilised.


Look at blends from different angles e.g. delivery and social blends

I particularly like that Clive encourages looking at blends from different angles. Often it’s easy to think of blended learning in terms of the delivery method only. Clive’s model and approach to blended learning encourages us to look at different parts of blends, such as, what will happen on the learning journey and when. The type of media that will be used. And importantly the type of social interaction that will occur during different parts of the learning journey.

In the slide below Clive shared a hypothetical blend for learning how to salsa dance. Notice how the blend is made up from different angles and not just delivery methods:

Clive Sheppard.png

Want to know more about Clive Sheppard’s blended learning approach:

Clive Sheppard’s blended learning model – http://www.bloomlearningsolutions.co.nz/design-engaging-blended-learning/

Clive on learning – http://clive-shepherd.blogspot.co.nz/

Want to know about more professional development opportunities like this:

Bloom Learning Solutions regularly puts on professional development events for the Learning and Development community. Keep an eye on their events and blogs and I’m sure you’ll find something of interest. The next webinar I’m attending is Augmented Reality (25th May 2016) and then one of my favourite International Learning Leaders Nigel Paine is taking a webinar on Leadership development and why it doesn’t work.

NZATD Content Curation session

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Thank you to all the people who attended the NZATD session on Content Curation this week. This is a follow up blog as I was asked for a copy of my presentation, and I also promised some links to further resources on content curation.

There was a good hum in the room and lots of learning and experience shared. As always I came away with some learning for myself. I learnt of some content curation tools, such as, Tubechop, this allows you to take a snip of a Youtube video rather than the whole video.

We brainstormed what skills are involved in content curation and came up with a wide range including: artistic ability, Google searching well, time management and knowing when to keep focused and avoid going down rabbit holes (or getting distracted by the panda as it was called in this session). Plus so many other skills that I haven’t listed here.

It was amazing to see how easy it is to put in place content curation solutions within any organisation. We even had people who weren’t from L & D and still they had great learning solutions with regards to content curation! Some solutions I heard while walking around and listening to group discussions included utilising the Intranet better by making content easier to find – hey that’s not rocket science and what a great win! Others wanted to become more active themselves in content curation for their own professional development. Some wanted their team to pull together and keep their IP in one place so succession planning is easier.

As promised here are some links I’ve curated on content curation: http://www.scoop.it/t/content-curation-by-lorraine-minister

Below is the presentation used for this session, it may not make complete sense to those who weren’t there. You are welcome to use the presentation as long as you reference back to me and my blog.

Content curation session

Here are some of my other posts on content curation:

Learning resources from content curation

Content curation how can it be used?

The art and skill of content curation

Second hand shopping for elearning

I’d love to hear how you’re putting content curation into practice in your organisation (or how you intend to). Please share your thoughts in the comments below.

Developing flexible modern content

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Over the last several weeks I have been participating in Jane Hart’s Modern Workplace Learning group. This weeks task is to look at developing flexible modern content in the workplace.

So what does this mean? In Jane Hart’s Modern Workplace Learning she identifies that technology and web is enabling new ways of learning. That people are becoming more self directed to solve their own learning and performance problems and this approach is very different from traditional learning approaches. Modern content is continuous, on demand, bite sized, on the go, social, not designed, serendipitous and performance orientated. Read more in chapter 2 of Jane Hart’s Modern Workplace Learning – A resource book for L&D.

I agree with all of Jane Hart’s observations on the characteristics of modern learning. Here’s a personal example of modern learning in action. My husband recently built a pizza oven at our house. He had never laid a brick and is a bus driver and stay at home dad by day. He did not go on a pizza oven building workshop, nor did he get tutored or mentored on how to build pizza oven. Instead he was self-directed in his problem solving and researched the web and found websites and Youtube clips with how to build different types of pizza ovens. He took bits of information from different sites, sometimes commenting and asking the bloggers specific questions. He trialled techniques and went back to research when more info was needed. From this he built his own customised pizza oven, in his own time, that met his own specific needs (i.e. fitted in the limited space and used the fire bricks we bought cheaply). His performance was measured through the results – which I must say are delicious!

pizza 3

So how do we bring this modern learning into the workplace? It is such a contrast to what happens within workplaces as most view that learning can only happen and be believed to have happened if it is delivered to the staff (workshops, online courses, programmes etc). Completion and attendance can be checked off and the job of learning is done – then we move onto the next learning job.

To embed modern learning into the workplace is mostly a change of mind set and usually this is required first from the Learning and development departments that are wedded to courses and outputs. Learning and development departments need to take responsibility with showing the workplace ways people really learn and embedding this in practice. Learning is a continuous process not a one off event, a one-off training event will do little to solve performance problems.

Curating content and communicating resources to staff members is one way in which modern learning can be brought into the workplace. Here’s a blog on how I’ve started doing this in my workplace – learning resources from content curation. Why would we not point staff to useful bite-sized resources that they can pull and utilise as they need it? Why not even follow up on ‘learning events’ with curated relevant content? I know some excellent learning resources that would be useful for all staff such as Lynda.com, Tedtalks, Mindtools and many more. Why not promote these resources to all staff then they too can be familiar with resources that can help them grow?

Working as learning consultants rather than just learning deliverers is another way in which to build continuous learning practices into teams and management, teach the skills and practices around learning rather than just the content. Building new attitudes and culture towards workplace learning means that learning can be viewed as a continuous, embedded and forever improving approach to work performance.

Does this mean courses are bad and shouldn’t happen? I think no, courses (elearning or facilitated) will always have a place – just a smaller one. They shouldn’t be the automatic first or only offer of help from L&D. And when a course is deemed an appropriate learning response it needs to be more than a one-off event. Courses can and should be supported by other techniques such as learning plans, curated content, self-directed research, social learning and learning communities. The course anatomy will also need to adapt, for example, small bite sized chunks are more suited to modern learning now than a week out at a workshop.

How do you see flexible modern content? What are you doing your workplace to move towards this? I’d love to hear your thoughts…

 

The art and skill of content curation

Content curation is a smart way of using already existing resources, such as, images, animations, videos, websites, blogs, apps and artifacts, and blending them together in a new and creative way for a specific purpose.

Skill level in content curation will make the difference between completely missing your audience with parts that don’t make sense together or have no purpose, to creating a cohesive story that powerfully connects and makes your audience think beyond the resources that have been curated.

This curated video that gives an overview of the skill involved:

Here Welenia 2013 give a visual overview of  different processes to organise and sort the best and most relevant content:

Let’s look at the skills of content curation in a bit more detail:

Knowing where to find stuff

When curating on a topic it is important to know where you can find quality content fast.

Externally curating

You can curate content externally from the world wide web. Here are some excellent websites that have quality content that can be used for learning resources:

Ted Ed lessons worth sharing – this site consists of lessons built around curated videos both from Ted Talks and from Youtube

Ted Talks – hundreds of inspiration talks on a wide range of topics. Many talks given by thought leaders in their field of expertise.

Mindtools – online training materials for management, leadership, and personal effectiveness skills.

Depending on your purpose and topic you may  find relevant content in Youtube, blog posts, industry websites, and Twitter feeds. Finding out who the thought leaders are for your subject can be a good strategy, as their digital content may point you to relevant videos, images, infographics, websites or blogs.

Think outside of the box to illustrate a point. For example, a learning objective I recently had in body language resources was about ‘the importance of matching body language to what is being said to build trust and credibility’. A video of a child lying and a forum discussion activity surrounding this demonstrated the objective well and made it interactive. A video of the Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky scandal with a link to a web site that analysed his body language also supported this learning objective well.

Internally curating

You can also content curate from staff in your organisation by inviting them to share expertise and resources on a topic. How about having a list of staff expertise so others can find the right person to ask?

Internal curation may include processes, job aids, information on the company intranet such as policies, useful information for use within teams.

What ways could you curate content internally?

Mass content curation

Why not invite others to content curate for their learning or invite staff to share resources and content they’ve found useful on the topic you’re curating.

Everything has a purpose

Make sure everything has a purpose and your learning objectives and performance outcomes are well defined. All the curated resources and content should be linked to the learning objectives and performance outcomes.

Be brutal here, if the content doesn’t link back to your objectives and outcomes leave it out. Don’t get distracted with using a cool animation you found in Youtube that has bling and looks beautiful, but lacks in message.

Be selective, prioritise resources that support your purpose the best. If you have found a large amount of resources on your topic don’t include everything, include the best ones only.

It’s also important to know when to stop when you can’t find a resource to illustrate your point. Once I spent an hour looking for the perfect image to illustrate my point, which unfortunately didn’t seem to exist, only to find that I could create my own in 30 minutes.

Storytelling and flow

Storytelling and flow is really important for curated learning resources.

Museums are a great example of this. Check out some reputable museums in your area. Each exhibition will have a flow of curated resources to tell a story – the flow could be based on a timeline or by type of content (for us it could be grouped under learning objectives). Look at how museums tell stories and see what you could apply to digital content curation.

Here’s some examples from my local museum Te Papa (Wellington, New Zealand). An exhibition about immigration in New Zealand uses creative ways to make the history into stories. In the photos, see the time line on the floor of when different immigrants arrived in New Zealand, and the table where you can view videos of people sharing their immigration stories.

Extremely powerful and it was all from existing information. Believe me I spent a couple of hours in just this one exhibition!

For learning we too can get creative with our presentation of curated content, look for inspiration everywhere.

Make it interactive and continuous

Curated content for learning should be interactive and make people think about their situation and beyond. Design questions, social interaction, and activities to support the curated content. Why not show staff how they can practice these skills in different ways in the workplace. Go beyond event based learning and into continuous and self-directed learning.

In short, curation is a smart way of using already existing resources. To do content curation well though, still requires skill, insight, and creativity.

How have you used content curation for learning? What are your thoughts are content curation – share and let’s curate together 🙂