NZATD Content Curation session

content curation presentation.png

Thank you to all the people who attended the NZATD session on Content Curation this week. This is a follow up blog as I was asked for a copy of my presentation, and I also promised some links to further resources on content curation.

There was a good hum in the room and lots of learning and experience shared. As always I came away with some learning for myself. I learnt of some content curation tools, such as, Tubechop, this allows you to take a snip of a Youtube video rather than the whole video.

We brainstormed what skills are involved in content curation and came up with a wide range including: artistic ability, Google searching well, time management and knowing when to keep focused and avoid going down rabbit holes (or getting distracted by the panda as it was called in this session). Plus so many other skills that I haven’t listed here.

It was amazing to see how easy it is to put in place content curation solutions within any organisation. We even had people who weren’t from L & D and still they had great learning solutions with regards to content curation! Some solutions I heard while walking around and listening to group discussions included utilising the Intranet better by making content easier to find – hey that’s not rocket science and what a great win! Others wanted to become more active themselves in content curation for their own professional development. Some wanted their team to pull together and keep their IP in one place so succession planning is easier.

As promised here are some links I’ve curated on content curation: http://www.scoop.it/t/content-curation-by-lorraine-minister

Below is the presentation used for this session, it may not make complete sense to those who weren’t there. You are welcome to use the presentation as long as you reference back to me and my blog.

Content curation session

Here are some of my other posts on content curation:

Learning resources from content curation

Content curation how can it be used?

The art and skill of content curation

Second hand shopping for elearning

I’d love to hear how you’re putting content curation into practice in your organisation (or how you intend to). Please share your thoughts in the comments below.

Content curation how can it be used?

I’ve been dabbling in content curation for a few years now. My initial views on content curation in the learning space were rather limited, focused mainly on using content curation for course or learning resource design and development. I have an Instructional Design background after all!

My view of content curation has evolved and become broader. I now see many ways and levels it can be applied to the learning and development field and business.

Here are some levels I see content curation being applied to learning:

Content curation levels 3

Individual content curation

Individuals curate content for their own purpose and meaning. For example, I curate content for myself around learning topics that I’m interested in. I use my blog and other curation tools such as Twitter, Scoopit, and BagtheWeb, to organise the content I’m collecting. I refer back to my curated content when I have a project that is relevant to it.

Team content curation

Where a team collaboratively curates content and shares it within the team. The content is of common purpose and goals. I have worked in a team where we curated content on tools, templates, job aids, and useful websites around elearning and the LMS system that was in place. The content was curated within an Excel spreadsheet (old school but effective). It was used for team reference and was also used to help induct new staff members entering our team.

Learning resource curation

This is where resources are curated for particular audiences for a learning purpose. In another post I give an example of content being curated for customer service learning resources – learning-resources-from-content-curation.

Organisation curation

This is curating and putting meaning on content that is organisation wide. Examples of this could include databases or knowledge centres that contain business processes. Staff would look up the database when unsure on what to do and be advised of the correct process and any supporting documentation.

Industry curation

Curation that goes beyond an organisation or business and looks at the wider industry. This may include industry leaders or websites that curate content for their members, or just sourcing content from reliable industry sources. My own business is a learning solution business, specialising in elearning. There are some well known industry sites that provide curated content to help people in this industry, for example, The eLearning Guild, Elearning Industry, Articulate Storyline Community and eLearning Heroes.

What ways have you curated content for learning purposes?

I’d love to hear your thoughts on how curated content can be used.

Reflecting 2015 and learning 2016

You may have noticed I had a little break from blogging at the end of 2015, well now I’m back with a vengeance and will have heaps of tips and gems to share in 2016.

In 2015 I enjoyed exploring learning and content approaches beyond traditional blended learning. In one project I used curated resources and activities for a pull rather than push learning experience for customer service. In another project I created learning resources that were delivery method independent and therefore more flexible, adaptable and scalable than anything I’ve seen before! You can read about these approaches here: Learning resources from content curation, Going beyond blended delivery to…

The most popular hits on my blog in 2016 were: Rapid prototype vs storyboard? and The game of learning design. If you missed these why not check them out?

So what’s my plan for 2016?

I’ll carry on exploring curated content and using alternative learning solutions in my design rather than defaulting to “traditional online, facilitated, or blended courses”.

To support this I am engaging in the 2016 L&D Challenge run by thought leader Jane Hart, why not join me and start to think about modern workplace learning in a different way. To find out more check out Jane’s book Modern Workplace Learning and her blog http://www.c4lpt.co.uk/blog/.

I’ll be exploring some new technologies to support story telling and graphic design – keep an eye out for posts on these. Video will be a big part of my work plan this year so expect some posts on this as well.

Happy 2016 everyone, what’s on your radar for the coming year?

Learning resources from content curation

content-curation

Want to work smarter, how about repurposing already existing content? I love curating and repurposing content, check out my post – Second hand shopping for elearning.

So how can you curate content and use it for your learning resources? Here’s an example of how I’m doing it now.

I’m working on a customer service project. At first glance it looks mammoth with the huge amount of possible content, and also the need to contextualise the content for different audiences. But I’ve found ways to make this project smaller and more work efficient. The most critical factor is reducing the amount of development of “new” resources and to instead use existing content/resources in a smart way.

You may balk and think you can’t do this as your customer service needs are specific so you’ll need your own tailored content – and you’re right, your needs are specific. Learning will still need to be targeted, have context, and be meaningful to your people. However you can provide context and meaning without having to develop everything from scratch. Context and meaning can be provided through activities and questions surrounding the content, allowing you to use already existing content that you’re curated from the internet or youtube. You can also use existing resources curated from within the organisation you are working with.

Here’s a taster of how curated content could be used:

Example: Empathy and customer service

  • Start with a poll e.g. ‘how important is empathy for providing customer service?’.
  • Ask thought provoking questions about empathy and how it is related to their work role.

From this we can see context is provided through the poll and, questions – not through creating new resources. Then we can use already existing resources to create a deeper meaning of empathy. There are some excellent videos around empathy that could be linked to, here’s an example of one:

 

  • Questions or activities could be provided around any of the learning resources. You can also increase social learning by suggesting questions are discussed with their team, manager or peers.

There are a multitude of activities that could be designed around curated content, the only limitation is your imagination. Think reflective learning, social learning, problem solving and learner sourced content. How about an activity recognising empathy blockers or a challenge where the learners are the agony aunt and have to provide responses?

In summary

Using curated content means that the majority of your effort is used finding high quality resources rather than creating. It’s much more time efficient – how long would it have taken you to make an animated video about empathy? You could make a story out of your curated resources so they have flow. Bring the learner in by designing activities around the curated resources that give context and the opportunity for staggered practice and mastery.

How have you used curated content for learning? – share your thoughts in the comments and we can all learn more together!